Know More about Dye Sublimation Printing Pressing Process

If you're doing dark colors, you lay your white ink first and then you lay your colors and then your CMYK on top of that. You're not done. There's one more step. And even though you print on it and it looks awesome, the colors pop. You do need to fix it. You still need to heat press it so that way the ink will cure.
 
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That can take another 60 to 90 seconds on top of that. So unlike printing, let's say with eco solvent inks, when you're printing on to a media, once you print, you let dry you're good to go. Well, for direct to garment printing, you still need a heat press machine where you will cure the inks and then also, depending on the type of paper that you put over the inks before you press, it can also determine the type of texture and finish of the inks you'll get.
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For instance, if you use a parchment paper to lay on top of the ink, after you're done with pressing your inks, an image will have a smooth matte finish. Now if you use a Teflon paper or some sort of release sublimation tranmsfer paper, you'll get a glossy finish. So it's going to mirror that paper or whatever you put on there. It's going to kind of grab that finish and the texture. If you do an indirect pressure, you may get a rougher hand more like a screen printing feel. So you have some versatility in that sense in regards to the end results.
 
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With white inks you have that versatility where you can print on dark colors. But with white inks there comes other issues as well. Just be aware that the particles of the titanium dioxide that's used in white ink pigments have a tendency to clog the nozzles. Unless you are running white ink every day, it may be best to look into not doing dark color T’s in the beginning. That was just some food for thought regarding what we saw and heard from people with DTG printers.
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